NZI 2019 Staff JOEL HERNANDEZ 05

Joel Hernandez

Policy Analyst

Policy Analyst Joel joined The New Zealand Initiative after completing his Master’s in Economics at Victoria University where his work focused on productivity, labour economics and game theory. Before this, he completed a Bachelor of Science from the University of Otago, majoring in Microbiology.

Currently, Joel is working on education research using data from Statistic’s New Zealand’s Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI).

Latest reports:
Research Note: The State of Schooling (2020)
Insights and Excellence: School success in New Zealand (2020)
In Fairness to our Schools: Better measures for better outcomes (2019)
Research Note: Tomorrow’s Schools: Data and evidence (2019)

 

Phone: +64 4 499 0790

Email: joel.hernandez@nzinitiative.org.nz

Recent Work

Insights and Excellence cover

Research Note: Insights and Excellence: School success in New Zealand

This research note is the third in a series of reports discussing the Initiative’s school performance tool and school evaluation in New Zealand. We present three case studies showing how three secondary schools performed before and after our tool separated the contribution of family background from the contribution of each school. Read more

Joel Hernandez
Research Note
9 March, 2020
1 Article Thumbnail Template

Tinder Economy

Depending on your own experience with dating apps, you might be surprised to learn that success in the online dating market is not distributed equally. So, this Valentine’s Day, spare a thought for those struggling to find love among the insidious and “unjust” inequality on apps like Tinder or Bumble. Read more

Joel Hernandez
Insights Newsletter
14 February, 2020
Economist4

Bungled census jeopardises evidence-based policy

In a letter to a select committee last week, Liz MacPherson, chief statistician of Statistics New Zealand (SNZ), said about 240,000 individuals had only partially completed the 2018 census. This, on top of the 480,000 individuals who did not complete the census at all, increased the census data gap to more than 700,000 individuals (or 14.3 per cent of the population). Read more

Joel Hernandez
The Dominion Post
18 April, 2019

Stay in the loop: Subscribe to updates